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22 Aug
GISELE BÜNDCHEN SPEAKS FOR THE TREES
GISELE BÜNDCHEN SPEAKS FOR THE TREES

Gisele Bündchen’s home is like a mini-ecosystem: chicken coops, beehives, vegetable gardens, compost heaps. “I wanted my children to experience the same joy and connection to nature I did as a child,” says the supermodel and mother of two. “Activist” gets tacked on to a lot of job descriptions these days, but Bündchen was impassioned about the environment long before it was cool. She credits her Brazilian upbringing—she hails from the small town of Horizontina—with her appreciation of nature, and a 2004 trip to the country’s Xingu region with her eco-awakening. She stayed there with the Kisêdjê tribe and “got to see firsthand the problems they were facing because of the pollution of the river,” she says. “From that moment, I knew I had to do something. I’ve been advocating for social and environmental causes ever since,” including clean water, reforestation, wildlife preservation, and clean energy. “After all,” she says, “our survival depends on it.” In 2008, she and her family cofounded Projeto Água Limpa (“Clean Water Project”) in Brazil.

For five years, “we planted over 40,000 trees on the riparian margins of the stream and cared for the land until the trees grew strong,” which, she says, not only improved the water quality of her hometown but also helped restore its wildlife. Bündchen is also a goodwill ambassador for the UN Environment Programme, a role that has involved field missions to Brazil and Kenya. In January, she fired back at her country’s agriculture minister, Tereza Cristina Dias, who had called her a “bad Brazilian” because of her environmental activism. In a response letter published in the Brazilian press, she called out those who would look to develop the area for profit. “An immeasurable heritage [is] threatened by illegal deforestation and the squatting of public lands,” she wrote. “These, yes, are the ‘bad Brazilians.’ ” It was a potent reminder that you’d better think twice before coming for Gisele—or the land that she holds dear.

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22 Aug
NAOMI CAMPBELL IS SAVING THE WORLD ONE FASHION SHOW AT A TIME
NAOMI CAMPBELL IS SAVING THE WORLD ONE FASHION SHOW AT A TIME

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHRIS COLLS; STYLED BY ILONA HAMER

The first place in the United States where Naomi Campbell set foot was New Orleans, courtesy of a shoot for British ELLE. Years later, when Hurricane Katrina struck the city, she, like so many people, sat helplessly watching the disaster unfold on TV. “What can we do?” she asked herself. “We have to do something.” For Campbell, that “something” was mobilizing the fashion community to take action. So with only a week to go before New York Fashion Week, she convinced the then-head of IMG, Teddy Forstmann, to give her a tent in Bryant Park. The result was the first-ever Fashion For Relief show. With Beyoncé and Pat Cleveland walking the runway in looks from Marc Jacobs, Gucci, and Calvin Klein, it was that fashion-beloved thing: a “moment.” “Corny as it may sound,” she says, “we came together to do something.”

Campbell has always been a uniter. The first time she went to Brazil, she visited the favelas, despite being warned not to go there. She found their inhabitants to be “very giving, very sweet, not dangerous people,” whom she connected with instantly. She’s forged similar bonds with Syrian refugees in Jordan and young women in Lesotho living with HIV. And she’s involved with the #Togetherband campaign, a partnership between the UN Foundation, Bottletop Foundation, UBS, Eco-Age, Project Everyone, and TO.org to work toward the UN’s 17 global goals for sustainable development. She teamed with TO.org on its Shadowman Van initiative, which has helped build a public bathroom and community center out of discarded plastic bottles in Uganda.

 

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Dress, Tom Ford.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHRIS COLLS; STYLED BY ILONA HAMER

Fashion For Relief is still going strong, and its events have raised money for the victims of natural disasters, including the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan and the 2013 typhoon in the Philippines. Campbell even teamed up with fellow supermodels Linda Evangelista and Christy Turlington to support Knot On My Planet, the elephant-preservation charity for which Doutzen Kroes serves as global ambassador. “Africa is very close to my heart,” Campbell says. “I have a place in Kenya, and it’s tragic and disgusting to know that people are killing elephants for their ivory, destroying the nature and beauty of this continent. So it wasn’t very difficult for me to say yes.” The reunion ended up being one for the books. “Many people have asked us to come together on numerous occasions, but we chose this because we all feel the same way about it.”

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T-Shirt, Dior.

PHOTOGRAPHED BY CHRIS COLLS; STYLED BY ILONA HAMER

Conserving natural resources was something the supermodel’s mother “always drilled into me” when she was growing up—“Turn off the lights, don’t run water, be mindful.” Campbell strives to be sustainable with her wardrobe, too. She hangs on to pieces without regard for trend cycles. “I don’t care how old it is, if I have a connection or an affiliation or a love of the creativity of the person who made it and the design, I’m wearing it.” And occasionally, she even takes public transportation, as a recent Valentino ad campaign demonstrated. Does Naomi Campbell really take the subway off-camera? “Of course I’ve taken it,” she says. “And am I recognized? Yes, but if they say hi, I say hi. Do I take it often? No, I don’t. But I have taken it!”

Hair by Ro Morgan for Bumble and Bumble; Makeup by Adam Fleischhauer; Manicure by Andy Suh. Produced by Catherine Sans at Serlin Associates.

This article originally appeared in the July 2019 issue of ELLE.

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22 Aug
Ciara Just Swapped Her Long Ombré Locs For a Dramatic Pixie Cut
Ciara Just Swapped Her Long Ombré Locs For a Dramatic Pixie Cut

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GETTY IMAGES

Ciara—singer, fashion icon, and hair chameleon—is always down for switching up her look. Her ability to keep it (funky) fresh has always kept her fans on their toes. Most recently, Ciara wore a gorgeous set of brown ombré locs to the CFDA Fashion Awards last week. Now, she already has a new hairstyle this week that's giving us major '90s Toni Braxton vibes.

At Monday's ACE Awards, Ciara debuted a dramatic hair change. She went short for the summer in a choppy, jet black pixie cut that features textured layers and a slight fringe. It's possible that the new style could just be a wig, but we are definitely here for it.

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Ciara attends the 23rd Annual ACE Awards on June 10 in New York City.

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Here's a throwback of Toni Braxton for comparison:

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Toni Braxton at the 7th Annual Soul Train Awards in 1993.

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The pixie cut does wonders for Ciara's already stunning features, allowing us to truly appreciate her sky-high cheek bones. Ciara kept the rest of her beauty look simple, opting for classics like subtle black eyeliner, voluminous lashes, and a bold red lip for a pop of color.

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GETTY IMAGES

This isn't the first time that Ciara has had short hair, though—the singer previously wore a short bob with bangs back in February for the 91st Annual Academy Awards.

 

Before the bob, Ciara previously wore an edgy black side wept pixie cut back in 2009.

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Ciara’s pixie cut in 2009.

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Fingers crossed that Ciara keeps this beautiful, face-framing style—it's a real stunner.

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22 Aug
Street outfits Sorting
Street outfits Sorting

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JANELLE LLOYD

For the circus that is fashion week, what you wear is often just as important as what you end up doing. Beyond getting snapped by street style photographers outside shows and presentations, bloggers have to consider capturing their own content. The cycle of posting rests for no man.

We asked Janelle Lloyd of @waityouneedthis to share her thought process behind outfit prepping and styling during NYFW. "It’s an amazing week, but it’s also work," she told us over a glass of Chloe Wine at ELLE.com's annual fashion week lounge. "It's important to not get carried away and dress for real life, even during fashion week."

 

FIRST, YOU GET ORGANIZED.

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JANELLE LLOYD


"I start with the brands that I have a relationship with; those are the looks I [decide on] first. Then I'll see where there are trend holes that I can fill by borrowing pieces from showrooms—and I still buy stuff for fashion week!" Not everything she wears during fashion week is new either: she'll pull in vintage pieces, basics, or special items she bought earlier and has been waiting to wear.

 

When prepping outfits for this season, color played an important role. "It was because of one dress and the outfit I'm wearing today," she said, referencing the poppy pink suit pictured below. "Then, I wanted accessories that were equally as fun, so I looked for complimentary colored accessories." In turn, she fell for a bright bag, which then led her to put together more outfits she could carry it with.

THEN, THINK ABOUT WHAT MAKES A GOOD PHOTO.

There's no denying that capturing a street style photographer's attention is important, but it's not everything.

"I think about things being a little more eye-catching than normal, in terms of color, silhouette, and print," she admitted. "I do think fashion week is becoming a lot more casual than it’s been in previous years. People are wearing clothes that they'd actually wear to the office. You’re not seeing flamboyant things."

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JANELLE LLOYD

With followers who love liking her images because of her signature vibe (feminine and classic, but quirky), she doesn't stray too far from the norm during fashion week.

"I don't think my readers are surprised by the things I wear—it's just turning up the volume a little bit. I stay true to the silhouettes I love and have in my closet."

 

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Lloyd at the ELLE.com fashion week lounge

ROMAN YEE

BUT DON'T GET TOO ATTACHED TO ANYTHING.

 

 

Getting to borrow designer pieces is nice, for sure, but does she ever feel bummed when she has to send them back?

"I fall in love with clothes every day so I try to tell myself there will be another dress, there will be another great piece," she laughed. Trendy pieces are the ultimate items to borrow for a spell. "When you love it now, but might not in a year or so, it's nice to have the option to loan. I try to look for trendier pieces I know I'd never buy myself."

The poppy pink suit she wore to the ELLE.com lounge was a loaner (though she did sound sad about needing to give it back). "This was something I thought would be eye-catching and that I wouldn't have the opportunity to wear in my every-day. But, the silhouette is inherently me and still practical."

 

AND FINALLY, YOU STAY TRUE TO YOUR OWN STYLE.

 

JANELLE LLOYD

 

 

When dressing for fashion week, it's less about fashion weekand more about remaining accessible to followers who are there year-round. 

"As an influencer, it's less about the street style snap and getting coverage and more about my reader being able to see themselves in the pieces I'm wearing," she said. And while NYFW dressing (and borrowing clothes for it) can mean the price points of items she wears are higher than normal, her followers don't get mad. "They're excited to see you push the envelope a little bit."

"I'm not wearing a stiletto around New York City every day, so I'm not during fashion week either. When I was looking for bags to carry this week, if it was for a daytime outfit I looked for something larger—you want your outfit to look believable and real." 

Her commitment to authentic dressing means she'll also re-wear stuff (too bad if you've seen it on the 'gram before). "People look to us to be aspirational, but accessible too."

LEAH MELBY CLINTONLeah Melby Clinton is the Director of Branded Editorial Strategy at ELLE.com and MarieClaire.com, where she oversees the creation of co-branded stories covering fashion, beauty, and beyond.

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